THE WALKING HERBALIST PODCAST – EPISODE 44. THE “BELIEVE” HERBALISM & PASSIONFLOWER SHOW

Just another late fall/early winter week in New England with herbalists Mindy and Marc!

Tonight’s “Herb Nugget” is about believing. Believe in what works for you and forget all the negative hype!

The “Herb of the Podcast” is Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) Marc discusses the historical religious aspect of this plant, as well as its practical uses in modern society.

Mindy’s “Backed by Science” article is: Villet Stéphanie, et al. Open-label observational study of the homeopathic medicine Passiflora Compose for anxiety and sleep disorders. Homeopathy, Volume 105, Issue 1, February 2016, Pages 84–91.

“Wildcrafting and Homesteading updates” include Marc’s recent cold and the foraged herbs he used to feel better. Marc made elderberry syrup and Mindy made a basket from a common reed. (Phragmites spp.)

The Worldwide Herbal and Foraging News articles are this one, this one, this one, and this one. New rules for homeopathic medicines, radioactive Chernobyl berries, taking on the Green Revolution, and robot weedkillers.

Also, listener email and movie review.

Enjoy the podcast!

THE WALKING HERBALIST PODCAST – EPISODE 37. THE “CREATE” HERBALISM & EVENING PRIMROSE SHOW

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Poison ivy, prepping for a lecture, and discovering the beauty of the blue-bruising, pancake replica fungi, the Boletes mushrooms, Marc & Mindy return to Southie to record this episode.

Marc’s “Herb Nugget” discussing herbal creations, and using your imagination when preserving your fall harvests.

The “Herb of the Podcast” is Oenothora biennis, or Evening Primrose. This tall, lovely biennial is prized for its seed oil which contains omega-6 essential fatty acids (and in particular gamma linolenic acid (GLA). Mindy, on the other hand, loves to eat its leaves particularly minced and on pasta. Evening primrose attracts moth pollinators.

Mindy’s“Backed by Science” article is: Kim TS, et al. Comparative analysis of anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of FEMY-R7 composed of Laminaria japonica and Oenothera biennis extracts in mice and humans. Lab Anim Res 2015; 31(1): 7-12. A full-length .pdf of the entire article can be found here. The article talks about how a combination of kelp and evening primrose extracts can kill the bacteria responsible for ulcers.

We talk about our “Wildcrafting and Homesteading Updates”! Mindy misidentified white snakeroot (probably for another aster) during a plant walk last week and owns up to it! Marc talks about his lemon balm and sweetfern hydrosol bug spray. The duo made smudge sticks from sweet fern to use eventually as a smoldering bug repellant.

The Worldwide Herbal and Foraging News articles for this episode are this one, this one, and this one. Succession gardening for fall, a government subsidized mobile farmer’s market in Austin Tx, and plants that repel pesky bugs are the topics.

Stay tuned for a mini-episode next week!

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THE WALKING HERBALIST PODCAST – EPISODE 35. The “Go Ahead Laugh” Herbalism & Joe Pye Weed Show

Live from the Bunker! Marc & Mindy hole up in Western Massachusetts listening to the pitter patter of the rain on the roof and the low menacing rumble of thunder, all while being surrounded by nature’s light show. We need the rain, and Nature delivers!

Marc’s “Herb Nugget” reminds us that humor is the best medicine. So Mindy makes a funny…

The “Herb of the Podcast” are Eutrochium spp (that’s right, previously Eupatorium spp!), E. maculatum and E. purpureum. These are known as spotted Joe Pye weed 20160729_142054and sweet Joe Pye Weed, respectively. Gravel root is another common name.

20160814_204021Mindy’s “Backed by Science” article is:  Borchardt  JR et al. Antimicrobial activity of native and naturalized plants of Minnesota and Wisconsin. J Med Plants Res 2008; 2(5):98-110.  The .pdf is available here. These researchers test the antimicrobial properties of hundreds of plant species around the Upper Mississippi River Basin. This is a good article to print up and add to your herbalism collection!

We talk about our “Wildcrafting and Homesteading Updates”! Check out Mindy’s new hand-carved whistle, made from a sweet birch branch! Marc’s thyme oxymel (made from our garden harvest and locally sourced raw honey and apple cider vinegar is mac20160805_212209erating away! Mindy got poison ivy and had a chance to apply jewelweed directly to her itchy foot rash (see gross pic for proof!) The picture of the green stuff is the inside of the Jewelweed stalk. Of course you can learn all about it on Episode 33!)

The Worldwide Herbal and Foraging News articles for this episode are this one, this one, and this one! An 89-year old that grows 600+ pounds of food for charity in his small home garden, a couple who traded corporate life for a homestead, and a man who contracted botulism from improper canning are highlighted.

Enjoy the heat, and stay cool! See you next week!

 

THE WALKING HERBALIST PODCAST – (Mini) Episode 34: Joanne Hull and Natural Plant Dyes

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Marc & Mindy have been on the road, spending the past week in Upstate New York. Fortunately, we had a chance to sit down and talk with Joanne Hull (better known to Mindy as “Mom”!). We learned all about the Outdoor Natural Plant Dyeing Studio that she had built at her suburban home in Upstate New York.

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Take a look at these great shirts!

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We hope you enjoy this mini-episode, and will see you back for a full-length episode next week!

THE WALKING HERBALIST PODCAST – EPISODE 33. The “Family” Herbalism & Jewelweed Show

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Podcasting from on the road at Joanne Hull’s (Mindy’s Mom’s) Outdoor Natural Plant Dyeing Studio in the suburbs of Upstate New York, The Walk Herbalist duo talks plants!

Marc’s “Herb Nugget” reminds us of the importance of family.

20160725_111607The “Herb of the Podcast” is Jewelweed, or Impatiens capensis. See the pictures of plants with orange flowers!

Mindy’s “Backed by Science” article is: Motz VA, et al. Efficacy of the saponin component of Impatiens capensis Meerb.in preventing urushiol-induced contact dermatitis. J Ethnopharmacol. 2015 Mar 13;162:163-7. The researchers attempt to show that the efficacy of jewelweed against poison ivy is due to its soap-like qualities.

20160725_132244“Wildcrafting and Homesteading Updates” discusses the arrival of what Mindy calls the fall flowers: Boneset, Joe Pye Weed, and Goldenrod stand out. A stand of jewelweed has also been spotted in the family neighborhood, and some harvesting is planned. Paper bags of St. John’s Wort are strung up from a plant that was thinned out in front of the fire pit at the bunker (see picture).

The Worldwide Herbal and Foraging News articles for this episode are this one, this one, and this one. Vermont wildcrafters, New Zealand permaculturist, and high school farmers in Ithaca, New York represent!

Enjoy the hot, hot weather in a cool watering hole! Stay tuned next week for an interview with Joanne Hull on Natural Plant Dyeing!

THE WALKING HERBALIST PODCAST – EPISODE 32. The “Its Gettin’ Hot in Here” Herbalism & Staghorn Sumac Show

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Podcasting (and sweating) at the Bunker, Marc & Mindy sacrifice air conditioning to get the latest awesome episode of The Walking Herbalist Podcast up for you!

Marc’s “Herb Nugget” gives a list of (dumb) ways to keep cool in this sweltering heat.

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The “Herb of the Podcast” is Staghorn Sumac, or Rhus typhina. Marc enlightens us on its many uses, including his love of sumac-ade. The photos with red berry clusters are our Staghorn friends…

Mindy’s “Backed by Science” article is: Parveen A, et al. Challenges and guidelines for clinical trials of herbal drugs. 2015; 7(4): 329-333. A full-length version is available here.

“Wildcrafting and Homesteading Updates” talks about Sumac-ade (otherwise known as Rhus juice), including when to harvest the berries. Marc 20160716_155838made a gallon of ginger beer which will be ready to bottle tonight. Mindy foraged (and ruined) a handful of hazelnuts (see picture) by removing their husks too soon. The duo harvested another 4 pounds of basil from their home garden, and are dehydrating it both in an electric dehydrator as well as using the trunk of their hatchback car as a solar dehydrator.

The Worldwide Herbal and Foraging News articles for this episode are this one, this one, and this one. A high tech farming 15 year old entrepreneur, an apartment jungle in Brooklyn, and Canadian weed pulling vs. herbicide fight represent!

Have a terrific weekend, and stay cool!

THE WALKING HERBALIST PODCAST – EPISODE 29. The “Time Flies” Herbalism and Elder Show

Marc and Mindy follow up with listener Nicole’s suggestion about powdering foraged mushrooms, and her answer to our questions, namely 1) cook your foraged mushroom, and 2) dried mushrooms have a stronger taste, so use sparingly!

Marc’s “Herb Nugget” talks about the trickery of time: slow when you want it to be fast, and fast when you want it to be slow. Make the most of it this Independence Day weekend!

The “Herb of the Podcast” is Elder, or Sambucus spp. (in particular S. nigra and S. canadensis). Elder is one of Marc’s famous Shrub-er-trees (you know, either a shrub or a tree!), and has been medicinally used since at least biblical times, and is also steeped in superstition. It has been used traditionally and commercially for reducing the symptoms of colds. The featured photograph is a flowering elder tree taken from the grounds of our bunker in Western Massachusetts.

Mindy’s “Backed by Science” article is: Tiralongo E. Elderberry supplementation reduces cold duration and symptoms in air-travelers: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. A full .pdf of the article is available here. The researchers show that commercially available elderberry extract is useful in shortening a respiratory cold and decreasing the severity of symptoms.

“Wildcrafting with Marc & Mindy” discusses their latest endeavors of woodcarving (Mindy), and embedding flowers for preservation in clear resin (Marc). They discuss plants that are ripe for foraging in the Massachusetts area, including: yarrow (aerial parts), elder flower, purslane, St. John’s wort (flowers), and chicory (mark the plants so you know which roots to harvest come fall/winter!). Always be a hyper-responsible forager! Do your homework and make sure you know what you are doing!

The Worldwide Herbal and Foraging News articles for this episode are this one, this one, and this one. One drills home the fact that you can compost your scraps no matter where you live. Another talks about a huge urban vertical farmiing initiative in Newark, New Jersey. And the last one talks about playing music with vegetables. No I did not mistype that. Check out the youtube video of the Vegetable Orchestra here.

Happy Birthday America! Enjoy your weekend!